Police blame falling six-metre traffic light on too many dogs weeing on it

Cops in Japan have blamed local dogs and their bladders after a six-metre-tall traffic light toppled over.

The six-metre pole in the town of Suzuka was meant to have a 50 year lifespan, but after it lasted just 23 years an investigation was opened.

During the inquiry, eagle-eyed officers noticed that a lot of dog owners stopped with their pooch to let them pee against the pole.

Naturally, they ordered forensics in to find out more – and that’s when the Police Scientific Investigation Research Lab began to test for the presence of urea, reports The Mainichi.

They found there was a whopping eight times as many urea traces on the collapsed pole than an identical one across the street which had less visits from canines.

But even more shocking were the results of the ground tests — forensic police recorded a whopping 42 times more urea around the collapsed pole than across the street.

Boffins say the acidic urine quickened the speed of corrosion in the metal, which eventually led to it becoming weak and collapsing.

Lab leader Koji Takahashi explained how although the amount of urine is small, constant peeing over the course of many months and years can slowly damage the public infrastructure.

But dogs peeing on lamp posts is more about claiming territory than needing to empty their bladders, and owners can’t always control where they go.

So now owners in the area have been told to be diligent and carry a bottle of water with them to wash away the pee before it can damage and melt any other poles.

The cop’s traffic division pointed out it was lucky the falling post didn’t cause a pile up.

The group said: "The site is along a commuting route for a nearby elementary school, and it could have caused an accident during commute time.

“If they are urinated on for many years, traffic lights, which are public construction, can be eroded and collapse.

“We would like to ask dog owners to be aware and act accordingly such as having their pets excrete at home."

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