Bigfoot reward grows to over £1.5m as Oklahoma state government increases bounty

Budding Bigfoot hunters who think they have what it takes to catch the legendary beast could be in for a major payday.

The question of whether Bigfoot really exists or not could soon be settled now that Oklahoma’s state authorities have posted a colossal cash reward for the person able to capture the mysterious man of the woods and bring him safely back to civilisation.

Oklahoma State Representative Justin Humphrey originally suggested that lawmakers should set aside a $25,000 bounty for the safe capture of a live Sasquatch.

That already impressive sum has grown to over two million dollars as state officials have outlined how they will fund the enormous bounty.

State tourism officials have developed an entire Bigfoot-themed promotional campaign that includes branded numberplates, stickers, and a collectible “Bigfoot hunting licence.”

The tracking permits will be sold by various businesses along State Highway 259A, boosting the local economy.

"Tourism is one of the biggest attractions we have in my House district,” Rep. Humphrey explained.

"Establishing an actual hunting season and issuing licenses for people who want to hunt Bigfoot will just draw more people to our already beautiful part of the state.

Probably the most famous Bigfoot sighting is a short film clip film shot by Roger Patterson and Bob Gimlin in Northern California in 1967.

Since then, sightings have been fairly regular. There have been particularly convincing sightings made in 1994 Washington’s Blue Mountains, Allegheny National Forest in 2007, Provo Canyon 2012 and in Mississippi 2013.

One of the creatures has even been spotted on Google Maps. But as yet no-one has ever found a dead Bigfoot, or any other physical evidence.

Responding to suggestions that there’s no such thing as a Sasquatch, Rep. Humphrey replied: "A lot of people don’t believe in Bigfoot, but a lot of people do.

"Just like some people like to go deer hunting, while some don’t," he said.

"Having a license and a tag would give people a way to prove they participated in the hunt.

"Again, the overall goal is to get people to our area to enjoy the natural beauty and to have a great time and if they find Bigfoot while they’re at it, well hey, that’s just an even bigger prize."

He said the ultimate goal is to draw in tourists by providing safe, affordable fun.

Unless, of course, Bigfoot turns out to be real and doesn’t want to be captured. The mythical beast is said to be anything between seven and ten feet tall and weigh in the region of 35 stone.

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